Social Media Images – Menopause Bundle | Healthinomics.com

Share these ready-made visual Q&A images about menopause on social media. You’ll be able to educate your followers on everything from what menopause is and what symptoms are experienced during menopause to how long menopause lasts.

The best part is that you don’t even need to put the time into creating this content to post on social media yourself! Simply download the bundle and post each image to your social media pages in just a few simple steps!

Inside The Bundle

The Menopause Bundle includes 20 beautiful images:

Social Media Images – Menopause Bundle | Healthinomics.com

Image Content

  1. What is menopause?
    Menopause is a normal condition that all women experience as they age. The term "menopause" can describe any of the changes a woman goes through either just before or after she stops menstruating, marking the end of her reproductive period.
  2. What changes might menopause cause in my body?
    Menopause can cause many changes in your body. The symptoms are the result of decreased production of estrogen and progesterone in your ovaries. Symptoms may include hot flashes, weight gain, or vaginal dryness. It can also increase your risk for certain conditions like osteoporosis.
  3. What age will I be when I go through menopause?
    The average age of menopause is 51. The majority of women stop having periods between ages 45 to 55. The beginning stages of declining ovarian function can begin years before that in some women. Others will continue to have menstrual periods into their late 50s. The age of menopause is thought to be genetically determined, but such things as smoking or chemotherapy can accelerate ovary decline, resulting in earlier menopause.
  4. What's the difference between perimenopause and menopause?
    Perimenopause is the period of time right before menopause begins when your body is beginning the transition and the hormone production from your ovaries is beginning to decline. You may begin to experience some symptoms associated with menopause. Your menstrual cycle may also become irregular. Once you completely stop having a menstrual cycle for 12 consecutive months, you’ve entered menopause.
  5. What symptoms are caused by the reduced levels of estrogen in my body?
    About 75 percent of women experience hot flashes during menopause, making them the most common symptom experienced by menopausal women. Hot flashes can occur during the day or at night. Some women may also experience muscle and joint pain, known as arthralgia, or mood swings.
  6. When do I know that I’m having a hot flash?
    During a hot flash, you’ll feel your body temperature rise. Hot flashes affect the top half of your body, and your skin may even turn red or become blotchy. This rush of heat could lead to sweating, heart palpitations, and feelings of dizziness. You may experience hot flashes multiple times daily over the course of a year or several years.
  7. How does menopause affect my bone health?
    The decline in estrogen production can affect the amount of calcium in your bones. This can cause significant decreases in bone density, leading to a condition known as osteoporosis. It can also make you more susceptible to hip, spine, and other bone fractures. Many women experience accelerated bone loss the first few years after their last menstrual period.
  8. Is heart disease linked to menopause?
    Heart disease risk rises for everyone as they age, but for women, symptoms can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases. However, certain risk factors increase around the time of menopause. A high-fat diet, smoking or other unhealthy habits began earlier in life can also take a toll.
  9. Will I gain weight during menopause?
    The hormonal changes of menopause might make you more likely to gain weight around your abdomen than around your hips and thighs. But, hormonal changes alone don't necessarily cause menopause weight gain. Instead, the weight gain is usually related to aging, as well as lifestyle and genetic factors.
  10. Will I experience the same symptoms as my mother, sister, or friends?
    The symptoms of menopause vary from one woman to another, even in the same families. The age and rate of decline of ovary function differ tremendously. That means you’ll need to manage your menopause individually, and what worked for your mother or best friend may not work for you.
  11. How will I know if I am going through menopause if I’ve had a hysterectomy?
    If you’ve had a hysterectomy, you may not know you’re going through menopause unless you experience hot flashes. This can also happen if you’ve had an endometrial ablation and your ovaries weren’t removed. Endometrial ablation is the removal of the lining of the uterus in women who have heavy menstrual bleeding.
  12. What is the best way to cope with depression during menopause?
    The best way to deal with menopause-related depression is to correct the hormonal imbalance that’s causing it, preferably with the help of a gentle alternative treatment. In the meantime, lifestyle changes can also help to relieve mild depression, like improved sleep, exercise, and diet, engaging in relaxing activities, reconnecting with old friends, and talking to a therapist.
  13. Is difficulty concentrating normal during menopause?
    Yes, difficulty concentrating is a normal occurrence for women of menopausal age. It is a direct result of fluctuating hormone levels and is widely experienced in varying degrees of severity. Studies have shown that up to 2/3 of women experience some aspects of difficulty concentrating during menopause.
  14. When should I consult my doctor?
    You should contact your doctor if you experience adverse symptoms that affect your ability to function, or if you notice anything unusual that might require a closer look. There are plenty of treatment options to help with symptoms like hot flashes.
  15. How long does menopause last?
    Menopause lasts on average, approximately 5 years. However, this can vary and could be a lot shorter or longer.
  16. Is bruising normal during menopause?
    The outside of the body is affected by fluctuating and declining hormones during menopause. Low levels of estrogen can cause a decrease in skin’s elasticity. It also lessens skin’s ability to retain water, which it uses as a buffer against injury. This makes skin thinner, and painful bruising is often the result. The backs of the hands are particularly sensitive to bruising.
  17. Is it normal to experience a crawling sensating under my skin?
    Many women describe this symptom of severe itchiness, likened to “an insect crawling under the skin”. This is called “Formication” and is well described as a common symptom of menopause. For most women, oestrogen supplementation will treat this symptom rapidly.
  18. What is the outlook for pain caused by menopause?
    Pain related to menopause is quite common. Most aches and pains, including those related to intercourse, may be reduced or eliminated with treatment. Pain and menopause do not have to impact the quality of your day-to-day life.
  19. How is menopause pain treated?
    Pain-reducing treatments include over-the-counter pain medication, such as ibuprofen, to help with joint pain or headaches. Ice packs can help reduce knee and lower back pain. Dietary supplements, such as evening primrose oil, may help reduce breast tenderness. Talk to your doctor before you begin at-home treatments.
  20. Do I need to keep having Pap smears after menopause?
    It’s important for women who've ever had sex to continue having regular Pap smears once every 2 years after menopause, especially since the risk of cervical cancer increases with age. Pap smears are generally recommended until the age of 70 years. After this, you may no longer need to have Pap smears, providing previous Pap smears were normal.
  1. What is menopause?
    Menopause is a normal condition that all women experience as they age. The term "menopause" can describe any of the changes a woman goes through either just before or after she stops menstruating, marking the end of her reproductive period.
  2. What changes might menopause cause in my body?
    Menopause can cause many changes in your body. The symptoms are the result of decreased production of oestrogen and progesterone in your ovaries. Symptoms may include hot flashes, weight gain, or vaginal dryness. It can also increase your risk for certain conditions like osteoporosis.
  3. What age will I be when I go through menopause?
    The average age of menopause is 51. The majority of women stop having periods between ages 45 to 55. The beginning stages of declining ovarian function can begin years before that in some women. Others will continue to have menstrual periods into their late 50s. The age of menopause is thought to be genetically determined, but such things as smoking or chemotherapy can accelerate ovary decline, resulting in earlier menopause.
  4. What's the difference between perimenopause and menopause?
    Perimenopause is the period of time right before menopause begins when your body is beginning the transition and the hormone production from your ovaries is beginning to decline. You may begin to experience some symptoms associated with menopause. Your menstrual cycle may also become irregular. Once you completely stop having a menstrual cycle for 12 consecutive months, you’ve entered menopause.
  5. What symptoms are caused by the reduced levels of oestrogen in my body?
    About 75 percent of women experience hot flashes during menopause, making them the most common symptom experienced by menopausal women. Hot flashes can occur during the day or at night. Some women may also experience muscle and joint pain, known as arthralgia, or mood swings.
  6. When do I know that I’m having a hot flash?
    During a hot flash, you’ll feel your body temperature rise. Hot flashes affect the top half of your body, and your skin may even turn red or become blotchy. This rush of heat could lead to sweating, heart palpitations, and feelings of dizziness. You may experience hot flashes multiple times daily over the course of a year or several years.
  7. How does menopause affect my bone health?
    The decline in oestrogen production can affect the amount of calcium in your bones. This can cause significant decreases in bone density, leading to a condition known as osteoporosis. It can also make you more susceptible to hip, spine, and other bone fractures. Many women experience accelerated bone loss the first few years after their last menstrual period.
  8. Is heart disease linked to menopause?
    Heart disease risk rises for everyone as they age, but for women, symptoms can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases. However, certain risk factors increase around the time of menopause. A high-fat diet, smoking or other unhealthy habits began earlier in life can also take a toll.
  9. Will I gain weight during menopause?
    The hormonal changes of menopause might make you more likely to gain weight around your abdomen than around your hips and thighs. But, hormonal changes alone don't necessarily cause menopause weight gain. Instead, the weight gain is usually related to ageing, as well as lifestyle and genetic factors.
  10. Will I experience the same symptoms as my mother, sister, or friends?
    The symptoms of menopause vary from one woman to another, even in the same families. The age and rate of decline of ovary function differ tremendously. That means you’ll need to manage your menopause individually, and what worked for your mother or best friend may not work for you.
  11. How will I know if I am going through menopause if I’ve had a hysterectomy?
    If you’ve had a hysterectomy, you may not know you’re going through menopause unless you experience hot flashes. This can also happen if you’ve had an endometrial ablation and your ovaries weren’t removed. Endometrial ablation is the removal of the lining of the uterus in women who have heavy menstrual bleeding.
  12. What is the best way to cope with depression during menopause?
    The best way to deal with menopause-related depression is to correct the hormonal imbalance that’s causing it, preferably with the help of a gentle alternative treatment. In the meantime, lifestyle changes can also help to relieve mild depression, like improved sleep, exercise, and diet, engaging in relaxing activities, reconnecting with old friends, and talking to a therapist.
  13. Is difficulty concentrating normal during menopause?
    Yes, difficulty concentrating is a normal occurrence for women of menopausal age. It is a direct result of fluctuating hormone levels and is widely experienced in varying degrees of severity. Studies have shown that up to 2/3 of women experience some aspects of difficulty concentrating during menopause.
  14. When should I consult my doctor?
    You should contact your doctor if you experience adverse symptoms that affect your ability to function, or if you notice anything unusual that might require a closer look. There are plenty of treatment options to help with symptoms like hot flashes.
  15. How long does menopause last?
    Menopause lasts on average, approximately 5 years. However, this can vary and could be a lot shorter or longer.
  16. Is bruising normal during menopause?
    The outside of the body is affected by fluctuating and declining hormones during menopause. Low levels of oestrogen can cause a decrease in skin’s elasticity. It also lessens skin’s ability to retain water, which it uses as a buffer against injury. This makes skin thinner, and painful bruising is often the result. The backs of the hands are particularly sensitive to bruising.
  17. Is it normal to experience a crawling sensating under my skin?
    Many women describe this symptom of severe itchiness, likened to “an insect crawling under the skin”. This is called “Formication” and is well described as a common symptom of menopause. For most women, oestrogen supplementation will treat this symptom rapidly.
  18. What is the outlook for pain caused by menopause?
    Pain related to menopause is quite common. Most aches and pains, including those related to intercourse, may be reduced or eliminated with treatment. Pain and menopause do not have to impact the quality of your day-to-day life.
  19. How is menopause pain treated?
    Pain-reducing treatments include over-the-counter pain medication, such as ibuprofen, to help with joint pain or headaches. Ice packs can help reduce knee and lower back pain. Dietary supplements, such as evening primrose oil, may help reduce breast tenderness. Talk to your doctor before you begin at-home treatments.
  20. Do I need to keep having Pap smears after menopause?
    It’s important for women who've ever had sex to continue having regular Pap smears once every 2 years after menopause, especially since the risk of cervical cancer increases with age. Pap smears are generally recommended until the age of 70 years. After this, you may no longer need to have Pap smears, providing previous Pap smears were normal.
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