Social Media Images - Food Allergies & Chronic Illnesses Bundle | Healthinomics

Sharing posts about food allergies and chronic illnesses on social media is more than just an act of spreading awareness; it’s a powerful tool for fostering empathy, providing education, and promoting support. When we communicate openly about these issues, we not only educate others but also empower those living with such conditions by validating their experiences. Imagine the relief of someone discovering a shared story that mirrors their own struggles or the life-changing moment when they encounter a post that leads to a diagnosis after years of uncertainty. Ultimately, being vocal about these topics makes a resounding statement: no one should navigate their health journey in silence or solitude.

Inside The Bundle

BONUS 20 sample captions for you to share with your bundle!
BONUS Editable Canva Template!

The Food Allergies & Chronic Illnesses bundle includes 20 beautiful pieces of visual content:

Food Allergies Chronic Illnesses Bundle | By Healthinomics

Image Content

  1. Can food allergies cause chronic or persistent symptoms? Aside from sudden symptoms, yes. Food allergies can contribute to chronic conditions such as atopic dermatitis (eczema) and various gastrointestinal illnesses in infants, children, and adults.
  2. Can food allergies cause asthma? Generally not. But during a severe allergic reaction to food, asthma may flare. Triggers of asthma include respiratory infections, exercise, and allergens in the air, such as pollens, dust mites, and animal dander.
  3. How often does food allergy contribute to chronic asthma? Various studies show that foods contribute to asthma episodes in fewer than 1 in 25 asthmatic children and even less frequently among adults. Even so, isolated chronic asthma, without food allergy, skin reactions, or gut symptoms, is rare.
  4. Can food allergies cause hay fever? Generally not. Nasal symptoms – itching, sneezing, runny nose, and congestion – are common during a food allergy reaction, but chronic hay fever is typically attributable to allergens in the air, such as pollen.
  5. Can food allergies cause chronic hives? Usually not. A few studies suggest that the chemical nature of food additives may contribute to chronic hives in fewer than 5% of cases. As a chemical effect, this is not an allergy. True food allergies are rarely related to chronic hives.
  6. Can food allergies cause eczema? There is some controversy here. About one in three children with more than mild atopic dermatitis (eczema) have food allergies, including anaphylaxis. Some children do have food-related flaring of their atopic dermatitis.
  7. How is food allergy related to eczema / atopic dermatitis? Some studies show that removal of a particular food allergen can help relieve symptoms and that the symptoms increase when the food is returned to the diet (unless the allergies are outgrown).
  8. Which foods may contribute to eczema / atopic dermatitis? The most likely triggers for children are eggs, milk, wheat, and soy. When the cause is identified, and removed there may be improved control of the rash.
  9. What stomach, digestive, or intestinal symptoms are triggered by foods? Foods can cause these symptoms due to an allergy: pain, heartburn (acid reflux), nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and poor nutrient absorption. These can lead to weight loss, poor weight gain or growth failure. Most gut problems, however, are not due to a food allergy.
  10. Can food allergy cause infant colic? A baby with severe eczema and gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea may have a food allergy and may be irritable and crying in relation to these symptoms.
  11. Can food allergies cause constipation? A few studies link milk allergy to constipation that has not responded to other measures. By far, however, most constipation is not related to food allergies.
  12. Can food allergies cause Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)? Possibly. If symptoms such as pain and vomiting occur consistently and soon after eating specific foods, evaluations are necessary.
  13. Can food allergy cause acid reflux? Reflux is usually not caused by food allergies, although a few studies have shown a link for some people, especially to milk in children.
  14. Is celiac disease a food allergy? No, symptoms are different and do not resolve. Celiac disease is caused by an immune system response to gluten, a protein in wheat, and related proteins in barley and rye.
  15. Does food allergy cause mucousy, and bloody stools in infants? It may be a food allergy called food protein–induced proctocolitis. This causes the stool in infants to have mucous and blood. It is most often diagnosed in breast-fed babies. These babies are otherwise well, are growing normally, and do not have other symptoms.
  16. What causes proctocolitis? Proctocolitis is a minor allergic response to a protein, such as a cow’s milk protein in infant formulas or passed in the mother’s breast milk. The illness is generally mild, and the baby is otherwise well. Other potential causes include soy, eggs, wheat, and others.
  17. My infant had severe vomiting two hours after a meal, became pale and sleepy, and later had diarrhea. Is that a food allergy? It may be a food allergy called food protein–induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). The most common triggers are milk and soy. When grains are responsible, usually oat or rice is the allergen.
  18. What is Food Protein-induced enterocolitis Syndrome? FPIS is a serious food allergy that usually starts in infancy. The symptoms are severe vomiting and diarrhea. Unlike typical food allergies, there are no hives or wheezing, and allergy tests by skin or blood are negative.
  19. Should a child with FPIES have epinephrine available? Yes. A self-injectable epinephrine should be on hand for FPIES. Also, the main concern is to restore fluids. Parents would not use this treatment unless the child is very ill and delayed in getting to a healthcare provider for fluids.
  20. Why are there delayed reactions to some foods? Delayed and chronic allergic reactions to foods are a result of immune cells causing inflammation, rather than IgE antibodies causing the sudden release of chemicals that trigger hives and anaphylaxis.
  • Canva templates
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  • All images are high resolution PNG
  • Includes fully editable Canva template
  • Includes 20 social media post captions
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  • Canva templates
  • Includes 20 ready-made Images
  • All images are high resolution PNG
  • Includes fully editable Canva template
  • Includes 20 social media post captions
  • Add your own branding!

Share this: